HOPE TO HEAL

Hope for those suffering from Lyme Disease

One Amazing Food!

(chicken liver mousse-this was fabulous!)

(see recipe below)

I’ve never been a huge fan of liver. However, since my recent diagnosis of severe anemia, I realize that liver is my friend. I found this amazing story on the WAPF site. Links are given if you’d like to see the entire article by Lynn Razaitis.

A CURE FOR ANEMIA

Pernicious anemia is a debilitating disease caused by B12 deficiency. Until 1926, the only treatment for the disease was blood transfusions. Shortly thereafter, Drs. Whipple, Murphy and Minot received the Nobel Price for their discovery of liver therapy for the disease. Dr. William P. Murphy recalls the discovery of the therapy:

“Dr. George Whipple of the University of Rochester had demonstrated that liver caused a rapid replacement of blood in dogs made anemic by bleeding. From his idea, we proposed that liver might be useful in treating pernicious anemia, even though this anemia was totally different from the one induced in dogs.

“With these observations, it became important to prove the efficacy of liver. But in those days, getting permission to do studies was not such an easy matter. The chief physician of Peter Bent Brigham Hospital was quite skeptical, but gave me permission with the understanding that a transfusion would never be withheld from a patient who needed one.

“I started one of my patients on liver therapy. This patient, a man in his forties, was critically ill and partially comatose. In spite of his condition, I was able to explain to him that liver might be distinctly useful to him. We found that if a patient were fed half a pound of liver per day, it would take about five days to show an increase in red blood count.

“But this man seemed more ill on the fifth day. According to the policy laid down, my patient was a candidate for a transfusion. I stayed up very late that night trying to decide to give him the liver. It was a miserable night, but around midnight I noticed that his red blood cell count had increased slightly. That gave me courage to go on with the liver. When I saw his blood count go up, I went home and collapsed into bed, slept very poorly and was back at the hospital at seven o’clock the next morning.

“I approached his room with fear and trembling, and cautiously peaked around the corner to see if he was still alive. To my great surprise and relief he sat up in bed and cheerfully asked, “What time is breakfast?” His blood count was at the maximum and he not only survived but lived many years. With that success, the staff became cooperative.

“Later, patients didn’t have to choke down liver but could receive extracts and still later, vitamin B12. . .”

For those who want to prevent pernicious anemia from ever occurring, the best course of action is to eat liver once a week, as our ancestors usually did.

~~~

I also found this great new recipe on the same site at WAPF. It sounds really yummy. I’ll use cream instead of sour cream (just because that’s what I have on hand). Plus I also read another recipe using bacon! That sounds good too.

Liver with Sour Cream

Serves 4

2 1/2 pounds liver (calf, pork or beef), sliced
2 onions, chopped
1 cup sour cream
4 tablespoons butter
2 cup beef stock
2 tablespoons dill, freshly chopped
2 tablespoons unbleached white flour
sea salt and pepper to taste

Wash, pat dry, and sprinkle each piece of liver with salt and pepper. Dredge in flour, fry on each side in butter and remove. Sauté the onions until golden brown and then layer both liver and onions in a deep pot. Deglaze the pan with beef stock, stir well and add the sour cream, stir, then add to the liver and onions. Mix well and cover. Cook slowly over low-heat for 20 minutes. Uncover, stir well, re-cover and cook for another 10 minutes. Remove liver from pot, arrange on individual plates and pour sauce over the slices. Sprinkle with the dill. This is very good when served with boiled or fried potatoes or rice.

~~~

Here is another great recipe from my friend Ann Marie. I made it w/o the cognac. Mine is photoed above and it is delicious!!! I’m wondering if it would be as good with beef liver.

Balthazar’s Chicken Liver Mousse

1 pound chicken livers
1/2 pound plus 4 TBS butter, melted
1 egg
2 tsp salt
Pinch of quatre-epices (equal parts nutmeg, allspice, cloves and cinnamon)
Pinch of freshly ground white pepper
2 TBS Cognac

1. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.
2. Brush 6 4-oz ramekins with the 4 TBS melted butter.
3. Process the chicken livers, egg, salt, quatre-epices, pepper, and Cognac in a food processor. (I left out the Cognac, since I wanted to feed this to Kate. I didn’t have any white pepper so I used black pepper instead. And I used freshly grated nutmeg, only because I happen to have whole nutmegs and a nutmeg grater.)
4. With the food processor running, slowly add the 1/2 pound of melted butter. Blend for 15 seconds.
5. Pour the mixture into the ramekins, filling 3/4 of the way.
5. Set the ramekins in a baking dish and fill the baking dish with water to half the height of the ramekins.
6. Bake for 30 minutes.
7. Let the ramekins cool, and then refrigerate until needed.
8. Run a warm knife around the edge of each ramekin, cover with a plate, and invert.
9. Serve chilled (we ate it room temp) with baguette toasts.

~~~

We aren’t sure yet, why I am severely anemic, but in my opinion it matters not. Not that it doesn’t matter, we will get to the bottom of it, but I mean, eating liver. I will up my liver intake to fit the doctors experiment in the above story. Oh boy, 1/2 lb liver a day!!!!! Man, I think I’ll go through a bunch of my 100 onions, plus all that liver from our steer. If I have to eat liver, I’d rather have chicken livers, BUT you guessed it….beef liver is the better! Look at this chart. It’s amazing! Look at the Vit A! Look at the Selenium! Look at that Potassium…it’s better than a banana!  Just look at the amazing nutrients…this for sure is a nutrient dense food if I ever saw one!!!!

Liver Comparison Chart

From: Nutrition Almanac, by John D. Kirschmann

Beef Lamb Veal Chicken Duck Goose Turkey
Amount 1lb 1lb 1lb 1 1 1 1
Weight: gm 454 454 454 32 44 94 102
Vitamin A 199130 229070 102060 6576 17559 29138 18403
Vitamin B1 1.16 1.81 .9 .044 .528 .062
Vitamin B2 14.79 14.9 12.3 .628 .838 2.21
Vitamin B6 14 1.36 3.04 .24 .72 .78
Vitamin B12 363 472 272 7.35 23.7 64.6
Biotin 454 454
Niacin 61.6 76.5 51.8 2.96 6.11 10.35
Pantothen
Acid
35 32.7 36.3 1.98 7.81
Folic Acid .99 .99 236 752
Vitamin C 140 152 161 10.8 4.6
Vitamin E 6.36
Calcium 36 45 36 3 5 40 7
Copper 12.7 25 36 .126 2.62 7.07 .512
Iron 29.5 49.4 39.9 2.74 13.4 11
Magnesium 59 64 73 6 23 21
Manganese 1.23 1.04 .083 .294
Phosphorus 1597 1583 1510 87 118 245 319
Potassium 1275 916 1275 73 216 303
Selenium 206
Sodium 617 236 331 25 132 98
Zinc 17 17 .98 2.53
Total Fat 17.5 19.6 21.3 1.23 2.04 4.03 4.05
Saturated Fat 6.8 6.9 42 .63 1.49 1.28
Unsaturated Fat 5 6.63 .5 .59 1 1.73
Cholesterol 1360 1361 1361 140 227 475
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October 4, 2008 - Posted by | Diet | , , , , , , , , , , ,

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