HOPE TO HEAL

Hope for those suffering from Lyme Disease

Healing Soups

It’s that time of year when we crave and need soups & stocks not only for warmth but for their healing powers. Sally Fallon goes into great depths on the healing powers of bone broth in her book Nourishing Tradtions. You can read more about it here.

Here are a few additional herbs that will enhance the powers of your soups & stocks to bring health and healing. Throw in a root or some leaves and reap the healing benefits. Of course there are many more that you may choose from, but these are a few of my favorites that I keep handy in the kitchen.

Astragalus root
Astragalus is a root that helps to strengthen protective defenses, nourishes the spleen, and tonifies the blood and lungs. It’s an immune system enhancer, and it also strengthens the adrenal cortex.

Nettle

Stinging Nettle: (Urtica dioica) builds energy and strengthens the adrenals, makes bones flexible, gives you healthy hair, and beautiful skin. 1 Cup of Nettle Infusion=500 mg Calcium, generous amounts of bone-building magnesium, potassium, silicon, boron and zinc. Excellent source of Vit A, D, E and K. And is a good source of B Vitamins.(1)

Thyme

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris), a very common culinary herb also has medicinal properties qualifying it as a wonderful cough remedy. Thymol, thyme’s volatile oil with antiseptic, antibiotic, and expectorant properties, is used in commercial cough syrups.(2)

Basil

Basil has potent oils that have proven to have antioxidant powers. Hence anti-aging, anti-cancer, anti-viral, and anti-microbial properties.(3)

Cayenne ( This is the only pepper used in our house for cooking, black pepper is hard on the stomach)

The potent, hot fruit of cayenne has been used as medicine for centuries.

In addition, it has been used for the following problems:

  • Gastrointestinal tract: including stomachaches, cramping pains, and gas.
  • Diseases of the circulatory system: It is still traditionally used in herbal medicine as a circulatory tonic.
  • Rheumatic and arthritic pains: Rubbed on the skin it causes a counterirritant effect. A counterirritant is something which causes irritation to the area to which it is applied. This makes it distract the nerves from the original irritation (such as joint pain in the case of arthritis).
  • Sore throat: If gargled with water it can work as an effective treatment for sore throats.
  • Styptic: Application of cayenne powder has traditionally been considered to have a powerful coagulating ability.
  • Thermogenic: Cayenne pepper is used both internally and externally in colder climates to protect against frostbite, it may be used in a crushed or powdered form in socks or taken internally in a tea to increase body temperature and circulation to the extremities. (4)

Chives

Chives are also rich in vitamins A and C, and contain trace amounts of sulfur and iron. (5)

Garlic

Who can say enough about Garlic!

Garlic has been used as both food and medicine in many cultures for thousands of years, dating at least as far back as the time that the Egyptian pyramids were built. Garlic is claimed to help prevent heart disease including atherosclerosis, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and cancer.

When crushed, Allium sativum yields allicin, a powerful antibiotic and anti-fungal compound (phytoncide). However due to poor bioavailability it is of limited use for oral consumption. It also contains alliin, ajoene, enzymes, vitamin B, minerals, and flavonoids.6
Ginger
The medical form of ginger historically was called “Jamaica ginger”; it was classified as a stimulant and carminative, and used frequently for dyspepsia and colic. It was also frequently employed to disguise the taste of medicines. Ginger is on the FDA‘s ‘generally recognized as safe‘ list, though it does interact with some medications, including warfarin. Ginger is contraindicated in people suffering from gallstones as the herb promotes the release of bile from the gallbladder.[4] Ginger may also decrease joint pain from arthritis, though studies on this have been inconsistent, and may have blood thinning and cholesterol lowering properties that may make it useful for treating heart disease.(7)
Parsley

Purslane

Purslane contains more Omega-3 fatty acids (alpha-linolenic acid in particular[4]) than any other leafy vegetable plant. Simopoulos states that Purslane has .01 mg/g of EPA. This is an extraordinary amount of EPA for land based vegetable sources. EPA is an Omega-3 fatty acid normally found mostly in fish and some algae. [5] It also contains vitamins (mainly vitamin A, vitamin C, and some vitamin B and carotenoids), as well as dietary minerals, such as magnesium, calcium, potassium and iron. Also present are two types of betalain alkaloid pigments, the reddish betacyanins (visible in the coloration of the stems) and the yellow betaxanthins (noticeable in the flowers and in the slight yellowish cast of the leaves). Both of these pigment types are potent antioxidants and have been found to have antimutagenic properties in laboratory studies.[6]

100 grams of fresh purslane leaves (about 1 cup) contain 300 to 400 mg of alpha-linolenic acid. One cup of cooked leaves contains 90 mg of calcium, 561 mg of potassium, and more than 2,000 IUs of vitamin A.(9)

Rosemary

Rosemary is extremely high in iron, calcium, and Vitamin B6.(10)

Sage

The Latin name for sage, salvia, means “to heal”. Although the effectiveness of Common Sage is open to debate, it has been recommended at one time or another for virtually every ailment. Modern evidence supports its effects as an anhidrotic, antibiotic, antifungal, astringent, antispasmodic, estrogenic, hypoglycemic, and tonic. In a double blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trial, sage was found to be effective in the management of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.

Internally for indigestion, gas, liver complaints, excessive lactation, excessive perspiration, excessive salivation, anxiety, depression, female sterility, menopausal problems.(11)

Tumeric

One of my all time favorites!!!

In Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric is thought to have many medicinal properties and many in India use it as a readily available antiseptic for cuts, burns and bruises. Practitioners of Ayurvedic medicine say it has fluoride which is thought to be essential for teeth. It is also used as an antibacterial agent.

It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. It is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and liver disorders.

It is only in recent years that Western scientists have increasingly recognised the medicinal properties of turmeric. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal titled, “Common Indian Spice Stirs Hope,” research activity into curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, is exploding. Two hundred and fifty-six curcumin papers were published in the past year according to a search of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Supplement sales have increased 35% from 2004, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health has four clinical trials underway to study curcumin treatment for pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, Alzheimer’s, and colorectal cancer.

A 2004 UCLA-Veterans Affairs study involving genetically altered mice suggests that curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, might inhibit the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients and also break up existing plaques. “Curcumin has been used for thousands of years as a safe anti-inflammatory in a variety of ailments as part of Indian traditional medicine,” Gregory Cole, Professor of medicine and neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA said.

Another 2004 study conducted at Yale University involved oral administration of curcumin to mice homozygous for the most common allele implicated in cystic fibrosis. Treatment with curcumin restored physiologically-relevant levels of protein function.

Anti-tumoral effects against melanoma cells have been demonstrated.

A recent study involving mice has shown that turmeric slows the spread of breast cancer into lungs and other body parts. Turmeric also enhances the effect of taxol in reducing metastasis of breast cancer.

Curcumin is thought to be a powerful antinociceptive (pain-relieving) agent. In the November 2006 issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism, a study was published that showed the effectiveness of turmeric in the reduction of joint inflammation, and recommended clinical trials as a possible treatment for the alleviation of arthritis symptoms. It is thought to work as a natural inhibitor of the cox-2 enzyme, and has been shown effective in animal models for neuropathic pain secondary to diabetes, among others.

Presenting their findings at the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in San Francisco in June 2008, researchers discovered that turmeric-treated mice were less susceptible to developing type 2 diabetes, based on their blood glucose levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests. They also discovered that turmeric-fed obese mice showed significantly reduced inflammation in fat tissue and liver compared to controls. They speculate that curcumin in the turmeric lessens insulin resistance and prevents type 2 diabetes in these mouse models by dampening the inflammatory response provoked by obesity.(12)

(1) Source: Susun S Weed

(2) Source:Henrietta’s Herbal Page

(3-12) Source: Wikipedia

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October 11, 2008 - Posted by | Diet, Gut Health | , , , , , , ,

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